Tag Archives: emo

Review: Simmer’s Paper Prisms

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Glittery emo quintet Simmer have returned with their debut album entitled Paper Prisms. Simmer previously impressed us with their 2015 EP Yellow Streak; a beautiful and delicate yet sharp and biting rock record that showcased an extremely accomplished sound for such a young band. Personal anticipation was high for this record, so do Simmer deliver the goods when they move onto their first long-player?

Sort of. This is clearly the same band that wowed us last year, but there’s something about Paper Prisms that feels like a band trying to spread their ideas too thin. The setup is identical to Yellow Streak; we get beautiful, sweeping guitar melodies complimented with sombre, lilting vocals and it’s all accompanied with a punchy performance on the drums. The one/two opener of Faze and Control is a perfect beginning to the record and it showcases all these elements beautifully.

However, what becomes apparent very early on is just how much time is spent on overindulgent moments of guitar feedback. Every song seems to start with a big wailing burst of feedback and in the case of some songs like Antwerp, they even linger to a limp conclusion using even more feedback. Simmer are clearly trying to create atmosphere on Paper Prisms and the guitar feedback is never abrasive or obnoxious in anyway, it just feels like it takes away from the immediacy of the song-writing. Songs like Calendar don’t kick in until half the track’s run time has gone by and it’s a bit annoying that so much time is spent holding a guitar to an amp.

It’s also a shame that the vocals often get lost in the mix. The vocals on Paper Prisms are often treated more like an instrument and they’ve been hidden away in the composition to the point that you can’t really make out what’s being said. It’s not the biggest problem because thankfully the gorgeous melodies are still audible; it just would have been nicer to have heard the vocals front and centre.

Simmer’s Paper Prisms is by no means a bad record by any stretch of the imagination. This is still a wonderfully light and dreamy emo record and as a debut album it certainly sets the band up with a great foundation to build on. Sadly it’s let down by a lot unnecessarily drawn-out moments of guitar feedback that have a tendency to kill the pacing. It Simmer can tighten up their song-writing and think of ways to meld the extra texture into the songs themselves, then their next release should be something really special.

7/10

Simmer’s Paper Prisms is out now and available to buy from Dog Knights Productions.


Live Review: Cassels, So-Crates and Grieving Live at The Old Blue Last 15/8/16

GRIEVING
grieving

Grieving are a very new band with a single EP under their belt. Their twangy, angular emo is reminiscent of bands like American Football and Joyce Manor. After a nervous start they quickly prove that they’re a very accomplished and tight act, and their drummer was supposedly pretty ill throughout so huge respect to that guy for absolutely nailing it. On the whole, the band looks like they’re having a blast and seem very humbled to be playing to this audience. Grieving are definitely a band you’re going to want to keep on your radar because if this performance is any indication, they will be going onto bigger and better things very quickly.

SO-CRATES
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If you aren’t aware, So-Crates are a new band featuring members of Hold Your Horse Is and Reuben and that’s a bloody exciting combination on its own. The band deal in an unpredictably, mathy post-punk which is nothing short of exciting when performed live. Their music twists and turns on a dime with aggressive drum-work, angular guitar melodies, chunky bass grooves and some surprisingly dreamy guitar leads. While it’s still early days for So-Crates, you can see that past experiences have allowed these guys to burst out the gates with some truly accomplished music and make it all look easy.

CASSELS
cassels

Grunge-punk duo Cassels are something really special. Sounding like a mix of God Damn and Eugene Quell, the two lads on stage make the sort of music that song-writers twice their age would be proud of. The word is clearly out on Cassels because they fill The Old Blue Last, and on a Monday night no less. The duo has a massive sound considering their limitations and they put on a friendly and engaging performance that sees everyone in the room hanging onto every note. Cassels love that quiet/loud dynamic and it was strangely weird to hear a crowd at The Old Blue Last be so quiet when the music became more introspective. Cassels are genuinely fascinating to watch and are definitely a band you’ll want to see as soon as possible because they won’t be playing venues this small for very long.


Year End: The 10 Best Albums of 2015

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10) Let’s Talk Daggers – A Beautiful Life

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“Regardless, Let’s Talk Daggers have made one of the most electric rock albums of the year. If you can appreciate guitar music that doesn’t sacrifice technicality for song-writing then Let’s Talk Daggers have delivered a record that does just that and even more. A Beautiful Life is an absolute tidal wave of riffs, tempo changes and yelping and despite the madness of its contents, Let’s Talk Daggers have brought it all together into one cohesive yet exhausting piece.”

Click here to read the full review.

9) Limb – Terminal

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“Terminal is the natural continuation from Limb’s self-titled debut and it’s an infinitely more enjoyable and masterfully crafted slab of hard rock. The band haven’t rested on their laurels and continue to get better on every record they release. The pressure is certainly on for the next release, lads!”

Click here to read the full review.

8) Torpor – From Nothing Comes Everything

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London doom behemoth Torpor wiped the floor with the rest of the doom offerings this year. The long-form nature of Torpor’s songs is beautifully tempered by the bands wonderful song-writing which ebbs and flows in a wonderfully natural way that means that 11 minute monsters like From This Time never outstay their welcome. Every riff on From Nothing Comes Everything is a crushing beast of a thing that demands some serious head-banging. This record is a real masterclass of doom song-writing.

Full review coming soon.

7) Svalbard – One Day All This Will End

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“By the end of the closing moments of Lily, Svalbard have taken you on a post hardcore journey like no other. One Day All This Will End is one of the best punk releases birthed in the UK and Svalbard have mastered an amazingly eclectic sound that’s equal parts angry, beautiful and forlorn. One Day All This Will End is essential listening to fans of post hardcore and a welcoming introduction to anyone looking to explore the more progressive side of hardcore.”

Click here to read the full review.

6) Employed to Serve – Greyer Than You Remember

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“It’s impossible to justify any criticism towards this record. Employed to Serve have absolutely mastered their craft and if dense, bastard-heavy hardcore is your thing than Greyer than You Remember is filled wall-to-wall with some of the genre’s finest moments. The album barely gives you a moment to breath in favour of demanding you mosh harder and it’s almost euphoric in its density.”

Click here to read the full review.

5) xRepentancex – The Sickness of Eden

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“xRepentancex have delivered a debut album that’s so furious it feels like it could tear apart at the seams. The Sickness of Eden is a hardcore record every fan of the genre should own and it’s almost beautiful in its sheer relentlessness. God knows how you follow an album this consistent. Good luck guys.”

Click here to read the full review.

4) Press to Meco – Good Intent

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“Press to Meco have delivered an album that showcases exactly what the trio are capable of. It’s a glorious, exciting monster of a record that is stuffed with technical wizardry and choruses so big that they deserve to be blasted across festival audiences all summer long.”

Click here to read the full review.

3) Old Skin – Beneath the Trees

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Old Skin’s debut album was the most bittersweet release of the year because while it is one of the best metallic hardcore albums this country has ever produced, its release also marked the demise of the band. Given away as a pay-what-you-want download to mark the final chapter of Old Skin’s career, this is an apocalyptic hardcore onslaught that never lets up. Old Skin might be gone but they’ve left behind one of the most disgustingly heavy records this country has ever produced and it deserves to be heard by everyone.

Full review coming soon.

2) Oblivionized – Life is a Struggle, Give Up

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“Life is a Struggle, Give Up is Oblivionized firing on all cylinders. This is an unforgiving attack of tech-metal, grind and deathcore that is sculpted with finite detail and it’s not afraid to hit you over the head with a monolithic riff for good measure. This might be an exhausting ordeal on your first listen, but give it the time it deserves and it will slowly unveil a metal record for the ages.”

Click here to read the full review.

1) Caïna – Setter of Unseen Snares

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“Setter of Unseen Snares is an album of unbridled fury, bleak atmosphere and eventually, shimmering post metal beauty. This is one of the most diverse and brilliantly executed black metal albums I’ve ever had the pleasure of listening to and it deserves to be heard by more than just fans of the genre.”

Click here to read the full review.

Notable Mentions
Monolithian – The Finest Day I Ever Lived, Was When Tomorrow Never Came. (click here to read the full review)


Year End: The 10 Best EPs of 2015

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10) Geist – Faith Healing

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Faith Healing ends with a monologue about the futility of worshipping a God who hasn’t done anything to prove that he actually, “loves you”. It’s a stark, bleak ending to an EP loaded with some of the most unforgiving hardcore the UK has to offer and a timely reminder that we need bands like Geist to provide a visceral release from the shitstorm that is real life.

Click here to read the full review.

9) Boxkite – Self Titled

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“Boxkite have burst out the gates with a hardcore debut that doesn’t mess about. This is 6 tracks of solid, bouncy yet strangely forlorn punk that leaves a serious mark. Anyone looking for the next great UK hardcore band might want to seriously consider grabbing Boxkite’s debut EP while it’s hot; you won’t regret it.”

Click here to read the full review.

8) Eulogy – Eternal Worth

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“Eulogy have hit their stride on Eternal Worth. This is a record that doesn’t mess about and gets straight to the point. This is a laser-focussed metallic hardcore assault that is big on groove and if the name change wasn’t a big enough indicator, it marks an important step up for Eulogy as a band.”

Click here to read the full review.

7) Simmer – Yellow Streak

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“Simmer’s Yellow Streak is a rare gem of a record. The EP is full of soaring melodies and satisfying riffs that are punctuated with a beautifully reflective vocal performance. Even though this is only the band’s second EP, it feels like they’ve already mastered their craft and Yellow Streak might be a defining moment in their career.”

Click here to read the full review.

6) Chubby Thunderous Bad Kush Masters – Earth Hog

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“Earth Hog is an easy recommendation to make. If you’ve ever enjoyed a riff that might result in whiplash then Chubby have delivered an absolute haven of guitar wizardry. Earth Hog is loaded with some of the best grooves stoner rock has to offer and it’s one of the most satisfying debuts of any band.”

Click here to read the full review.

5) I, The Lion – Run

Run EP Cover - FINAL

“I, The Lion’s Run is a wonderful celebration of riff rock. It’s a gargantuan-sounding EP loaded with some of alt-rock’s most thunderous melodies and it constantly evolves and welcomes new ideas into it’s already accomplished sound. A lacklustre opening hides one of rock’s most enjoyable EPs and I, The Lion need to be a band you start paying immediate attention to.”

Click here to read the full review.

4) Iced Out – Man’s Ruin

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“Iced Out have finally found their comfort zone. Man’s Ruin is an enormous, towering beast of an EP that sees the band embrace slower tempos and tunings so low you might soil yourself. Now it’s time for Iced Out to take their sludgecore leanings and finally deliver the sort of devastating album that Man’s Ruin is threatening to. Good luck, boys; we’re looking forward to it.”

Click here to read the full review.

3) Maths – The Fires Courting the Sea

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“Maths’ The Fires Courting the Sea is a phenomenal melodic punk record which manages to cram some of the most beautiful yet utterly pissed off music it can into its 10 minutes. Maths are still one of the UK underground’s most treasured acts and it would be sacrilege for any punk fan to skip on this record. You know what to do.”

Click here to read the full review.

2) SikTh – Opacities

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“Opacities is a fantastic comeback by one of the most dearly missed UK metal acts. SikTh are just as exciting and vital as they’ve ever been and despite the 9 year gap between Opacities and Death of a Dead Day, it genuinely feels like the band have never been away. Opacities has a wonderfully natural progression to it and it sounds exactly like the follow-up to Death of a Dead Day that we all dreamed of. It feels wonderful to finally say this but welcome back SikTh. We’ve really missed you.”

Click here to read the full review.

1) TEEF – Admit Defeat

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“TEEF have put together one of punk’s brightest moments. Admit Defeat is a non-stop powerhouse of grotty violence that’s amazingly memorable despite its aggression. No band in the UK has managed to meld fury with song-writing this catchy nearly as well as TEEF have managed to here and it’s a massive shame that the band won’t be making anymore music. Admit Defeat might be the last TEEF record but as swan-songs go, this couldn’t be any better.”

Click here to read the full review.


Review: Fightstar’s Behind the Devil’s Back

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Fightstar have finally returned with their first new album in six years and while it’s a horrible cliché to say a band have returned to their roots, the orchestral/stadium rock sound of Be Human hasn’t been explored further on their comeback album Behind the Devil’s Back.

If the artwork didn’t indicate a return to the band’s heavier sound with its inclusion of the band’s original logo, fans of the band’s earlier material will be happy to know this album feels like more of a continuation of the sound on 2007’s One Day Son, This Will All Be Yours. This means the album similarly blends two sounds in a similar way to One Day Son; there’s a heavier, Deftones-esque, alternative metal sound which is punctuated with a more tuneful, emo/post hardcore sound that will remind listeners of InMe. This is instantly obvious from the get-go as opener Sharp Tongue explodes out of the gates with a vicious riff that will ignite mosh pits the world over. This returns throughout the song but once the chorus rolls around, you’re treated to a dreamy vocal melody that is instantly recognisable as Fightstar.

The album then continues in a similar fashion but does a considerably better job of melding the two styles. While Sharp Tongue can feel a bit stop/start with its constant switch between metal and emo, songs like Murder All Over and Animal move in a much more natural way that sees the band flourish their anthemic melodies with moments of heaviness. Fightstar feel like they’ve finally nailed a signature sound instead exploring a different one like they did with Be Human.

Speaking of Be Human, fans of Fightstar at their catchiest will still be satisfied with a lot of Behind the Devil’s Back. For every Deftones-worshipping blast of aggression like the album’s title track, there’s a hugely memorable, stadium –sized banger to get your ears around. The real highlight comes in the form of Overdrive which is scarily infectious and the daft 80s synth in the middle eight is ludicrously fun. If the band don’t release Overdrive as a single they’re doing this album cycle a disservice.

Behind the Devil’s Back is the Fightstar album their fanbase have wanted for ages. This is a laser-precise slab of alternative metal blended harmoniously with some of the most memorable post hardcore the band has ever produced. People are very quick to write off this band as having a member of Busted in their midst doesn’t do them any favours with the heavy music elite, but ignoring their band members’ additional activities will reward you with one of the finest heavy rock albums of the year.

8/10

Fightstar’s Behind the Devil’s Back is out now and available from all good music stores.


Review: Press to Meco’s Good Intent

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We like Press to Meco. Their 2013 EP Affinity was our pick of the year and the tech-emo trio from Croydon really felt like they were destined for big things. Well, they were definitely destined for at least one big thing and it comes in the form of their absolutely anthemic debut album Good Intent.

Press to Meco have continued to get weirder and heavier and more tuneful for their debut album and it couldn’t be more welcome. The band are like a bizarre mash-up of Reuben and Periphery with all members of the band sharing vocal duties to create some wonderful, interweaving melodies that come together to force a massive hook right into your lugholes.

Musically, the band shift between chunky, groove-ridden tech metal and soaring post hardcore choruses with gleeful abandon. The band has inadvertently created some of the most approachable tech metal around and it’s thanks to their wonderful approach to song-writing. This means that even though a lot is happening in a single track, it ebbs and flows with a natural progression that is easy to follow without being bombarded with stylistic shifts and tempo changes.

The real jewel on Press to Meco’s crown is always their fantastic vocal melodies. Despite how heavy the music can get, the vocals hold everything together. The sugary vocal harmonies are fantastically dynamic and memorable and if you were given this record during your formative days with heavy music, songs like Family Ties, Means to an End and Manipulate would become defining songs of your youth. This is not to say that Press to Meco sound dated, just that if you were to introduce the younger generation to heavy music via this record then its approachable nature would start a new generation of heavy music fans for all the right reasons.

Another real draw on Good Intent is how it pops and fizzes with the sort of energy you’d get from a live recording. Unlike a lot of tech metal releases that favour hyper-defined, almost robot-like drum sounds, Good Intent is a thrashy, powerful record that lets the band’s performances shine. The guitar tones are full of grunt and the drums sound like they’re taking a monstrous beating. For a record loaded with uplifting emotion, it’s fantastic to hear a mix that doesn’t sound as sterile as some tech metal releases.

Press to Meco have delivered an album that showcases exactly what the trio are capable of. It’s a glorious, exciting monster of a record that is stuffed with technical wizardry and choruses so big that they deserve to be blasted across festival audiences all summer long.

9/10

Press to Meco’s Good Intent is released on the 16th of October through Best Before Records and can be pre-ordered via Pledge Music.


Review: Simmer’s Yellow Streak

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Simmer make a wonderful, clattery, emo racket in the vein of early Smashing Pumpkins and Feeder. Their 2nd EP Yellow Streak has a youthful bolt of energy running through it and it’s loaded with glittery melodies that are filtered through some lovely, crunchy distortion.

For an EP this wild and noisy, Simmer have a rather unnerving knack for making their music very approachable. This is helped with the dream-like, drawl of the vocal melodies which are easy on the ears. Some might say they’re a bit pedestrian and inoffensive but I feel like their understated nature allows the listener to focus more heavily on the instrumentation.

Simmer’s instrumentation and song-writing is the real highlight of Yellow Streak. The riffs have some additional reverberation which creates these fantastic images of massive, open plains and beautiful landscapes. There’s a summery and somewhat reflective vibe to the band’s music and it brings forth some wonderfully nostalgic feelings. It’s not often that a band’s music affects me in such a way but listening to Yellow Streak (especially the opening 3 tracks of Douse, Head Trip and Laying Odds) put me in such a positive mind-set.

When the EP comes to a close with its title track, the band’s music changes stylistically for the first time on the record; there’s a very sombre atmosphere on show. Simmer have structured this EP in such a masterful way that when it reaches its final moments it actually feels like the band are saying goodbye.

Simmer’s Yellow Streak is a rare gem of a record. The EP is full of soaring melodies and satisfying riffs that are punctuated with a beautifully reflective vocal performance. Even though this is only the band’s second EP, it feels like they’ve already mastered their craft and Yellow Streak might be a defining moment in their career.

9/10

Simmer’s Yellow Streak is out now through Dog Knights Productions. You can buy it on either translucent green or yellow 7″ by clicking here.


Review: Oh Captive’s Two Mirrors

Oh Captive - Cover Artwork

Oh Captive make the sort of chart-bothering, pop punk/emo combo that has been so popular with bands like Youmeatsix, Young Guns and Kids in Glass Houses and that’s fine if you like that sort of thing but the band are doing so little to prove their worth in this scene that their Two Mirrors EP could have been made by anyone.

The most irritating thing about this EP is that Oh Captive have managed to write a series of songs that don’t spark any emotion. The vocals are delivered in that tepid mid-range that so many young bands favour and it’s completely lacking in dynamics. The guitars feel like they’ve been belt-sanded smooth and they are completely devoid of any bite. Because of this I couldn’t pin-point a single riff I liked because they all drifted by like a ghost farting.

What really annoys me is that there’s clearly a competent band playing this music. The songs are well written, the choruses aren’t offensive to listen to and occasionally it sounds like they actually care about their music. The opening riff of the EP’s title track is a real stomper and I can envisage a crowd of kids losing their minds when it kicks off.

Unfortunately it isn’t too long until you’re reminded what’s wrong with this band; it’s all too safe. The vocals are capable at best but they won’t spark any meaningful connection between the listener and the band. The same goes for the music. This is heavy guitar music with none of the heavy and it’s bewildering to me that I didn’t have the urge to nod my head along to a single track. That’s a serious failing for any band making rock music.

How do you get excited about a band that are painfully mediocre? There is simply nothing original about Oh Captive and Two Mirrors drifts by without a single memorable moment. There’s nothing wrong with the music and it’s quite competently put together but there isn’t a riff or melody that hasn’t been ripped from another band. Two Mirrors is an EP so bland that getting angry about it would be a waste of time.

4/10

Oh Captive’s Two Mirrors is out now through all major digital outlets.


Gone But Not Forgotten: Project Abner/The Abner

Let me tell you a tale of four very talented chaps who got dealt a bad hand. Dave, Olv, Apple and Wilson are the four members of Project Abner; an emo/pop punk/metalcore hybrid act who were functional from 2001 to 2004. The band toured and played lots of shows with bands like Days Ago, Zero Cipher, Eden Maine and Aconite Thrill. In 2002 to 2003 they wrote, recorded and released an EP called All My Love.

Now here’s where things get strange; the All My Love EP made it to press and some reviews also refer to it as the Follow the Pig EP. It would appear the EP was scheduled for a physical release in October 2003 but for whatever reason I haven’t been able to find anything as to the existence of physical CDs. This EP would have contained the songs As Kids Do, The Fable, Pour Fair L’Amour, Suited and Useless, Sighing Like Furnace and All My Love. Sighing Like Furnace and The Fable got released on a promotional CD-R that was given out at gigs.

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Here’s where things take a turn for the worst. Project Abner’s management got them into a position where they were being blacklisted by promoters and booking agents. It’s not clear what had happened but the band were furious with their manager and decided to dump him and their name in the process.

In 2004 Project Abner are reborn as The Abner. With renewed energy and focus the band record an EP called Chinoiserie Lounge for Basick Records and it’s sprung on the world in 2006. The EP is a wonderful mesh of Horse the Band and early Enter Shikari and the band christen their special blend of noise as partycore. Sighing Like Furnace is also revisited and given a fresh coat of paint and renamed The Penitent Man Will Pass. Copies of this EP are still available from Basick Records and every household should have one.

The band continue to trudge on but it becomes apparent that the band’s live appearances are becoming more infrequent and it isn’t until 2008 that new material surfaces. The Abner release a new single called D.I.S.C.O and it’s a frightfully catchy slice of up-beat punk-metal. I remember seeing the song live for the first time at a Basick Records showcase gig which included Without Thought and Fell Silent and it was an absolute joy to behold.

Work began on what would become The Abner’s debut album but interest in the band seemed to have completely faded. The Abner were appearing at incredibly under-promoted shows and one show at The Hope and Anchor only drew about 5 people (myself included). This sort of reception is heartbreaking when it happens to a band you care about and by 2009 The Abner decided it simply wasn’t worth the effort.

The band split without a farewell show but they gave their fans one final gift in the form of 5 album demos and the previously released D.I.S.C.O single. This final release is even more tragic in the fact that it shows a noticeable progression in the band’s song-writing. The songs are all wonderfully unique and progressive numbers like A Cowshed Riot Against the Glutton sit side-by-side with straight-forward rockers like Whiskey Punchout. The songs were initially shared by the band via mediafire but thankfully Basick Records have seen fit to give the songs another lease of life and re-released them as an iTunes EP called If You’re Listening To This… Where Were You In 2008?

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Did The Abner’s management kill the band’s chance at success? It’s difficult to say but in 2009 the UK lost one of the most original sounding rock acts to ever grace the toilet circuit. It’s not nice watching a band you love fall into obscurity and making heavy music in this day and age is a real labour of love. The Abner stuck with it for 8 years and they don’t deserve to be a footnote in UK rock’s history. Go and hunt down The Abner’s 2 EPs on iTunes and indulge in one of the weirdest rock bands ever birthed in the UK. You won’t regret it.

Andrew has kindly put together some additional information on the band which we present below:

“Our very last attempt at a show was in 2009 at the Water Rats where we turned up on a Thursday night to play and were told by the venue that they thought we would bring a crowd. We told them that they were sorely mistaken (haha), so they told us we wouldn’t be playing. We packed up our gear and that was that!

All My Love was a massive blow for us. We had been promised the earth by a con man and left out to dry with his dirty laundry. Basically we got an initial run of one hundred CDs and the printing was wrong on them. They never got a re-pressing because the label head hadn’t paid the bill. Almost cursed, you might say. One of the main reasons that Evolving Music (the label) collapsed is that they over stretched themselves time and time again. Properties in central London, full page adverts in Kerrang! and Rock Sound, t-shirts, stickers, you name it. All good stuff if the money is coming in. They booked a huge 30 date tour for the 3 bands potentially signing to Evolving (ourselves, Through Silence, and Shellshock) with 2 revolving headliners. Half the dates were scheduled for Skindred, and half for Mahumodo (with Mahumodo being the headliners for our shows, drawing a more suitable crowd for us). 3 days before the first show Mahumodo split up and the tour was a disaster as a result! Then we were lied to, etc etc. and the rest is history!

Basick Records saved us from the brink and we helped them by signing a free deal. They pressed our CDs and we bought them at cost. Any that Basick sold were their own. It worked for us and Nathan always had faith in us and our music. It was just a shame that the small piece of momentum we had left when we signed with them ran out before we managed to write a whole album.

Another note worth mentioning is that we toured with My Chemical Romance on their first 3 date UK tour (just before being blacklisted) and also with Skindred around the time that our label collapsed.

We got to the point where we had more fun being ourselves and we never ever fit into a pigeon hole from a visual perspective. We just enjoyed rocking out (and slagging off the crowd between songs).

I’d have loved it if we could have carried on but sometimes life just gets in the way. It’s really nice to know that there’s a little legacy out there though!”

PROJECT ABNER/THE ABNER WERE
– Dave Shanley (vocals)
– Andrew Wilson (bass)
– Apple (guitar)
– Olv (drums)

DISCOGRAPHY

As Project Abner
2 Track Promo CD-R (2003)
Subverse Volume 1 Compilation (2003)
All My Love/Follow the Pig EP (2003)

As The Abner
2 Track Demo CD-R (2004)
Chinoiserie Lounge EP (2006)
A Day for Light Refreshment Promo DVD (2007)
D.I.S.C.O Single (2008)
If You’re Listening To This… Where Were You In 2008? EP (2009)

Do you have memories of Project Abner/The Abner? Let us know in the comments below or drop us an email at ukscumscene[at]live.co.uk.


Year End: The 10 Best EPs of 2013 Part 2

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Before we start our list of the 10 best EPs of 2013, please remember that this list was decided by one person and therefore represents the opinions of one person. This will likely not reflect your own opinion but that’s okay; there’s room for more than one opinion in this crazy world of ours and your’s is just as valid. As per the theme of UK Scumscene, this list also contains releases by UK bands ONLY. Okay then, let’s get this show on the road:

5) Confine – Setting Fire to the Western Hemisphere

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What we said:

“Setting Fire to the Western Hemisphere is a like a wet dream for grindcore fans. Confine have managed to put together a fearsome, devastating slab of extremity that is bolstered by brilliant riffs, unbelievable drumming and some of the best arranged screaming on any metal record. Some actual thought went into this release; how often to you get to say that about a grindcore record?”

Read the full review by clicking here.

4) Cactus&Cardigan – Gag Reflex

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Cactus&Cardigan are a band that shouldn’t be shrugged off for taking on a humorous persona. Yes, this EP does have songs called ‘Smegma’ and ‘George Michael Cums Cobwebs’, but what Cactus&Cardigan excel at is making heavy noise-rock stuffed full of Earth-shattering riffs that won’t leave you. Despite being a band who exclusively use harsh vocals, they also manage to make every song on ‘Gag Reflex’ sound extremely memorable and the daft nature of the lyrics actually adds a lot of charm to the record. If anything Cactus&Cardigan sound like they had the time of their life making this EP and it’s been a staple of my listening in 2013.

3) Esoteric Youth – The Burden of Living

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What we said:

“Regardless, this is a minor complaint on what is one of the most furious metal releases I’ve heard in some time. At the moment, Esoteric Youth are the kings of UK blackened hardcore and The Burden of Living solidifies their position as one of the country’s most important heavy bands. This EP is undoubtedly the best release by the band so far and I’d hate to be in their position now because this is the watermark that will be held against everything they do from here on in. Congratulations and good luck guys.”

Read the full review by clicking here.

2) Old Skin – MÆRE

oldskin

What we said:

“Old Skin might be a fresh face but ‘MÆRE’ showcases a level of talent and song-writing that is heads and shoulders above their peers. This EP is a master-class in how to create a haunting atmosphere without losing any of the impact that heavy music delivers. Old Skin have delivered a thought-provoking first release that has to be one of the best débuts of any band.”

Read the full review by clicking here.

1) Press to Meco – Affinity

presstomeco

Press to Meco’s ‘Affinity’ is an EP that everyone needs to own. It’s quite simply the most original-sounding record I heard all year and the 3 lads from Croydon should be honoured to have created such incredible, genre-melding yet superbly catchy rock music.

What we said:

“It’s becoming far too difficult to find the words to say how important Press to Meco’s Affinity is. The band manage to blend progressive metal and post hardcore with an unsettling ease and make one of the most amazing experiences to come out of the UK heavy music scene in a very long time. Affinity is a brilliant rock record that you’ll seriously regret not jumping at when this band launch stratospheric. Buy this EP.”

Read the full review by clicking here.